#pragma once vs. #ifndef/#define

After getting in an extended discussion about the supposed performance tradeoff between #pragma once and #ifndef guards vs. the argument of correctness or not (I was taking the side of #pragma once based on some relatively recent indoctrination to that end), I decided to finally test the theory that #pragma once is faster because the compiler doesn’t have to try to re-#include a file that had already been included.

For the test, I automatically generated 500 header files with complex interdependencies, and had a .c file that #includes them all. I ran the test three ways, once with just #ifndef, once with just #pragma once, and once with both. I performed the test on a fairly modern system (a 2014 MacBook Pro running OSX, using XCode’s bundled Clang, with the internal SSD).

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The problem with select() vs. poll()

The UNIX select() API should have been deprecated years ago. While unsafe operations like sscanf(), sprintf(), gets(), and so forth all provide compile-time deprecation warnings, select() is also incredibly dangerous and has a more modern, safer replacement (poll()), but yet people continue to use it.

The problem is that it doesn’t scale. In this case, “not scaling” doesn’t just mean it’s bad for performance, “not scaling” means it can destroy your call stack, crash your process, and leave it in a state that is incredibly difficult to debug.

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xmousekeys

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This is a simple program for moving the mouse cursor around from a script. Useful as something to bind to a key event in window managers which allow such a thing but don’t have built-in keyboard-mouse functionality (such as pwm).

xmousekeys.c